Demography
Population
162,729
ADMINISTRATIVE AREA
22361.95 ha
Density
7.3 persons / ha

A city is a large human settlement. People are the main driving force in a city. The dynamism of a city is dependent  on people and their behaviour. A preliminary understanding of the composition and diverse capabilities of the populations in a city should be the key to a successful urban study.

Predictions made by identifying demographic and composition patterns of the population within the existing physical boundary will create a well-planned livable  city.
 
 
 
 
 

 

Population Growth rate

Source - Department of Census and Statistics

Considered about social information in the area the population is recorded as 113,084 in the year 2001 and has increased 162,729 by the year 2018. When compared to the total population in Colombo district, it is accounted for 6% compared to Colombo Dehiwala, Moratuwa, Kaduwela and Mahagama Divisional Secretariat areas.The annual population growth rate in the area during the period 1971-1981 was 2.06% and up to 2001, it was 1.13% and 2011, 1.84% and again in year 2018 it was reduced slightly to 1.73%. Accordingly, the average growth rate in the area is recorded as 1.5%. When considered about the population distribution in the Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area, high concentration can be seen in the urban centers like Kosgama, Hanwella and Padukka area from eastern part to western area along the main roads where average population density is 948 persons per sq km. GN division basis, the highest density in the year 2011, is recorded in Kundaluwila, Walawwatta, Pahathgama, Pitumpe south, Waga South, Galagedara, Kosgama, Kahatapitiya, Hanwella Town, Padukka and Arukwatta GN divisions. The population density in these areas is 1500 to 3000 persons per sq.km. The main reason for recording such a high density is due to existence of major commercial towns like Kosgama, Hanwella and Padukka within these GN divisions.

Population by Age Groups

Source - Department of Census and Statistics

According to the data released by the Department of Census and Statistics, the labor force in the age range of 15 - 60 is recorded as 62% and as per the Resource profile (2016) the age range from 19 - 60 is shown as a higher value.

Transport

Connectivity is central to key GoSL strategic aims: to promote economic growth, and to rebalance growth across the country’s 9 provinces. Higher the connectivity to any city, better is the urban growth in that city. 

Detailed information on key transport aspects including bus and rail transport, freight route maps, airports and logistic systems are aspects that should be considered for a city to be properly interconnected within the bigger system. One of the SDG targets 11.2 is about access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems, road safety, public transport, and if we are to move towards being sustainble, these need to be considered in tranpsort planning. Further, the needs of people in vulnerable situations, women and children, persons with disabilities and older persons should also be considered.

ICT coverage is another way of being connected and recent technological advances enable a city to be better connected through its access to ICTs as well.

Distribution of Road Network in the Area

Source - RDA (2016), PRDA (2016), Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha (2016)

With regard to the road network in the area, the “A” grade roads are located in northern side along the western boundary of the area. Colombo Ratnapura New road (High-level road) Colombo- Hanwella old road (Low-level road) The “B” grade roads include, Galagedara-Horana road, Kotte- Bope road, Thummodara-Puwakpitiya road, and Kaluaggala- Labugama road. Almost all other roads are remained as narrow roads. The road distribution pattern of the Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area. Around 30,000 vehicals are running in day time and 20,000 are running towards Awissawella as revealed from the surveys. The Kelani Valley railway line from Colombo to Awissawella is running across the Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area in the length of 25 km with the stations passing Padukka, Arukwatta, Angampitiya, Uggala, Pinnawela, Waga, Kadugoda and Kosgama where around 30,000 passengers are used railway for their daily needs as per the CGR reports.

Housing

An important function of Sri Lanka’s cities is to provide housing for the diversity of residents that support urban life. Sri Lankan early urban settlement legacy – histories, patterns, trends including land use and housing and the development challenges that come along with it have shaped the nature of our cities.

The share of housing as a proportion of built-up area across the different cities was considered, and numerous factors affect the figure. e.g. Anuradhapura, has restrictions on residential developments because of its cultural, historical and touristic importance, other MCs include significant social and economic land use, operating as a hub to surrounding suburbs and rural areas with large residential populations.

Housing policy challenges that are encountered by the city administrators relate to tenure systems, the supply of affordable, high quality housing, and difficulties accessing housing finance. 

Housing Distribution in the Area

Source - Department of Census and Statistics

When considered about the housing distribution of the area, the census and statistical data (2016) reveals that the total housing stock in the Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area in the year 2001, is 27,542 and year 2011 it was 35,137 and the years 2001-2011, the annual increase rate is counted to be 2.16%. When compared with the nearby areas of Awissawella, Homagama and Maharagama,it is an average figure and it is determined by the population growth in the area.

Housing Distribution in the Area by Housing Type

Source - Department of Census and Statistics

As per the census data, the number of persons per house is 3.8 in the Seetawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area. In the whole island this figure is recorded 3.9 and Colombo district it is 4.1. The housing composition in the Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area is as above. The highest housing density is recorded in the GN divisions of Kosgama, Hanwella, Pahathgama, Kundaluwila, Kudakanda, galagedara, Padukka and Arukwatta and the lowest density in the area is recorded as Udagama, kanmpella, Deegana and Ilukowita GN divisions. Based on the roads, a linear development has taken place and the main reason for which is found to be the availability of infrastructure and the developable lands. When considered about the housing classification the most of houses are belongs to single and two stories.

Housing Classification

Source - Department of census and statistic

Based on the material used for walls, foor, and roof, the classifcation on the basis of Permanent, Semi-permanent and Underserved (temporary). When analyzing the housing density in the area based on the above data, 92% of the housing units are falling within the livable category and 6% are required to be provided with infrastructure facilities. These houses are located in the areas like Thunthana, Walwwatta, Kundaluwila, Weragolla, Digana, Suduwella and Kodikanda area and underserved houses of 2% are identifed as developable units. The land terrain, existence of plantation areas and forest reserves, lack of infrastructure facilities have caused to prevail lesser housing density. High density of population in some areas have occurred due to alienation of lands by the governments from time to time and which has resulted to increase the housing density in those areas. It is reported that around 50 number of unauthorized houses have been constructed in the urban areas such as Hanwella, Padukka and Kosgama, and except the areas like Aluthambalama, Suduwella, in all other areas, the houses are located in scattered manner. However as per the statistical evidence, there is no any homeless people in the Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha area and there is no any trend of increasing the construction of unauthorized houses. Nevertheless, the houses are remained in improvise conditions.

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Proper management of land, a scarce resource, can bring about many benefits. This is of great importance especially in urban areas.

 

It is timely to figure out how land is allocated and being used for what purpose in our cities today. In order to create well planned cities with a futuristic vision, having a better understanding of current land use is imperative.

 

Land use maps are categorized into 36 sub-categories under two types – built-up and non built-up. The extent of land in each of these sub categories are indicated below.

 

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Built-Up
Total
Built-Up
(ha)
Non-Built-Up
Total
Non-Built-Up
(ha)

 

Studies on how the built-up landscape has changed in the urban environment over the past few decades have the potential to draw significant conclusions about current development trends and to predict future development orientations.

 

This urban sprawl study is a based on the analysis of satellite imagery from the relevant years. This gives the viewer a general idea of how urban sprawl has occurred over this period.

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Urban expansion statistics
Seethawaka Pradeshiya Sabha ( km 2 )
Overall Growth rate 1995 - 2017 %
Urban change 1995 - 2017
TOTAL AOI 0